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into a thousand pieces and put them together in the image of god and democracy. we must say, wake up, america! wake up! for we cannot stop and we will not and cannot be patient. >> on that day, 50 years ago, 250,000 people gathered here to demand the rights of full citizens. they demanded comprehensive civil rights legislation, school desegregation, full employment, living wages, and the aggressive use of federal authority to ensure economic political and social justice. 50 years later, we have made progress, was the struggle continues for those same demands. we will bring you the live coverage of the events here on the mall throughout the day, right here on msnbc. and as we get things started this hour, i am thrilled to be joined this morning by joy reid, msnbc contributor and managing editor of thegrio.com. she also leads nerdland whenever i'm on vacation. also, julian vaughn, naacp chairman emeritus. and next to him, the reverend william barber, head of the north carolina chapter of the naacp and leader of one of today's most important social movements for justice, the moral mondays protes
that was badly needed in america not only for those in attendance but those who could hear and see on television and to send a message to washington, to the state houses, to the local levels that the movement is still alive. and we have to believe that, and we have to act on it. i'm one of the old citizens of the time. i could not help but reflect on things such as the fact that we were not allowed -- people of color were not allowed on television shows. we did hold places in government. i used the theme that had such a negative connotation, stand your ground. i hope i got over to the crowd we need to seize that and use it as our own in a positive way. stand our ground for what we believe, for what we have worked and for what we have died for and move forward. >> it's a reclamation of that spiritual "we shall not be moved" that version of stand your ground. i love what you said about the young people. there was a group from howard university right there near where our msnbc stand was all day. i could sort of watch and see how they were responding. but it was also important what you just said abo
days. america's democratic journey took us through might struggles. from asia to america we know democratic transitions are measured not in months or years but sometimes generations. >> that was president obama speaking thursday from martha's vineyard about the violence in egypt. the message seems clear. we can't expect democratic reform overpass in egypt. we have to ask when the military wipes out the results of what many may have been imperfect but democratic in nature election how are we to think the country is starting down the path. i want to bring back in mona on that very question. we saw mubarak, 40-year dictator step down in february 2011. we are now really only two years on. can we really have expected egypt to stand up a u.s. style democracy in such a short time? are these the growing pains of democracy or is egypt really fundamentally off the rails. >> you know, what i think is happening we're appreciated for the unpredictability we have. for too long egypt was considered predictable. for too long five u.s. administrations support add dictator at the expense of the pe
, right? shouldn't we blame practices in place at bank of america and wells fargo. joining me to answer that, executive business editor of the "huffington post" and author of "past due." also shawna smith, the president of the national fair housing alliance. lynette cox who is co-founder of ask the money coach.com and author of "zero debt for college grads." i'll be talking to her later. and peter, let me start with you, what is the problem of housing prices for responsible homeowners. >> you hit part of it already. you had this predatory system, wall street hungering for higher risk assets because the world seemed so safe in the housing bubble. investors were pouring into anything with more risk. you had a retail operation in memphis, baltimore, where wells fargo targeted people with lower credit. they persuaded them to sign off on loans, people who needed credit because the wages weren't keeping up with the rising cost. lets pull back. we talked about predatory lending and subprime. even people who are responsible family members. post bubble, san diego or phoenix where houses went up
for the chemical attack. >> america should feel confident and gratified that we are not alone in our condemnation and we are not alone in our will to do something about it and to act. the world is speaking out and many friends stand ready to respond. >> the global interest in this conflict is not a contemporary phenomenon. the middle east, as we know it, was created by western imperialism, specifically by britain and france, which divided the region into prote o protectorates. britain took the further iraq, jordan, and israel. many of those countries gained independence during and after world war ii, only to see themselves become pawns of the u.s. or the soviet union during the cold war union. our involvement in the middle east is nothing new. but the question remains, are we going to war? joining me now is nbc chief foreign correspondent, richard engel, live near the turkish border with syria. richard, what's the latest? >> reporter: the latest is we are on tender hooks and so are many syrians, to see if the united states will carry through on its threats, and all indications are that it will.
quietly into the clutches of a sexual predator. it's a scenario that is played out daily on america's streets. one that just made headlines this weak, when more than 100 children were rescued by the fbi in a sex trafficking sweep of more than 70 u.s. cities. that sweep resulted in the arrest of 159 traffickers. joining me now from washington, d.c. is andrea powell, executive director of fair girls, an organization dedicated to preventing the exploitation of girls worldwide. miss powell, what aspects of this story, or the castro's sort of horror story play out in your work regularly? >> so i think one thing that's really important to point out in bringing in connection together is that sex trafficking is basically organized rape for profit. and the commonality is that just like michelle knight, young women and girls, and boys, all across the country are going through the same trauma and they're often being viewed as potentially perpetrators or that, you know, they somehow asked for it, because they're not screaming enough, because they didn't die. but the thing is that they need the
that's been at heart of america for a lot of years. and of course, the actual case of terry versus ohio came to play back in 1968, at which point it was determined for law enforcement, proper conduct in terms of how to conduct a stop and a frisk. and of course, with the reason for doing that being to satisfy a curiosity or a potential, an individual that a law enforcement officer is focusing on, could be wanted for a crime. but first, the officer must have an articulatable reason for that stop. in other words, he must suspect him of a crime. and of course that stop must be very brief and when an officer does that, he's doing it in pursuit of something that that individual did. it can't be a general kind of thing that an officer does. it has to be with specific reason, suspected of having committed or going to commit a crime. and of course in the frisk aspect are the ability for the officer to temporarily detain them, put their hands on them. this is, of course, for the officer's safety. and again, you must have a reason to think that that individual is armed. so it's a very important as
of america, of giving asylum to edward snowden, the president absolutely cannot go to a bilateral conversation with vladimir putin. >> so there's always a little moment for me, when condi rice and president obama are on the same policy page that always makes me want to pause and say, let's talk about that. do you agree? >> absolutely. i think the reset was great. they got as much out of it as you could. they got the start treaty, the transit route to afghanistan through russia, but then, things started to kind of go sour around the time of libya. the russians felt duped. they had abstained from vetoing at the security council. they couldn't vote in favor of it, but they abstained and felt the u.s. did a lot more than they said they were going to do. on their watch, qaddafi was killed. and the ambassador was harassed for months on the ground, in a very unprofessional, very sort of, this is not what states do to each other. and it went on from there. syria was a major irritant. and what you heard from the white house during this period was like, look, if you guys don't want to talk,
task force at the new america foundation and former senior policy adviser commissioner of the palestinian refugee agency, jeremy, president and founder of political home for pro israel pro peace americans. an msnbc contributor and foreign policy analyst for newsweek and managing director of the washington institute and former senior director for middle east affairs at the national security council. thank you all for joining me. i want to start with you. how important is it this happens now under this secretary of state and this president? >> the urgency is real. if they don't achieve peace now, the spiraling is real. palestinian authority likely could collapse. israelis would have to go back in and assume full civil and military control of the west bank, violence would erupt. in the context of the region you described, violence there sets off sparks around the whole region, so this an incredibly important moment and incredibly high stakes decision by the administration to go for it at this moment. >> it's not entirely unheard of for a second term american president to p
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)